Tag Archives: New Creation

Great Stories Have Great Endings 5

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This is part 5 of our series looking at Revelation 21-22

You may also like to read parts 1, 2, 3, or 4

5) It is a Place of Wealth and Beauty:

It is not insignificant to notice the size and the beauty of the city, its walls and its gates.  The city was 2200 kilometres long, and, as high and as wide as it was long. It was made out of pure gold (21v18).  The city walls were 65 metres thick, made of jasper and clear as crystal (21v18).  The foundations of the city were decorated with every kind of precious stone (21v19-20).  And the twelve gates were each made out of a single pearl (21v21).

It is important to remember that much of this imagery is figurative.  And so while we cannot say for sure what the city of the new creation will look like, the imagery of the city is mean to take our breath away with its size, wealth and beauty. The language John uses is meant to fill us with wonder and awe.  And captivate us with its immensity and beauty.  The new creation will not be a place of mere function or sterile uniformity, it will be a place of wonder, of beauty, creativity, awe and splendour.  Life in the city of God will be good and rich and free and beautiful!

The Kings of the earth will bring their splendour: (v24)

Twice it is mentioned that the treasures of the nations of the nations will be brought into the city.  “The Kings of the earth will bring their splendour” (21v24) and “The glory and honour of the nations will be brought into it (21v26).

John seems to suggest that all the wonder of song and story, of artefact and design, of art and architecture  of imagination and engineering, of function and beauty, of wealth and engineering will somehow be brought in and incorporated into the new creation.  The new creation will be a place of staggering diversity.

This life will somehow count for something in God’s restoring of all things.  German engineering, Italian art, French cooking, Brazilian football, Xhosa singing will not have all been amusements to keep us busy and then burnt up and forgotten.  The genius of Jimmy Hendrix, Bob Dylan, Miles Davis and Lauryn Hill will perhaps somehow not be in vain… I don’t know where they all stand with Jesus but somehow our world and our lives have been enriched by their music, their legacy.  Perhaps it will not all have just been a meaningless distraction from the march to be rid of this life?

And what of us?  Is it perhaps true that what we do now somehow echoes into eternity?  It seems that perhaps despite our sin and rebellion God chooses to ennoble our efforts, our work, our art and our lives.  He chooses not to simply wipe away all our fallen, weak and imperfect attempts at taking up and shaping his creation.  Is it perhaps possible that the creation mandate though deeply marred and broken, is not altogether forgotten?  Is it possible that God in his grace and mercy, when he finally wipes away sin and rebellion and restores all things, somehow still chooses to include and redeem our work and make it new along with the rest of creation?

The Tree of Life:

Finally notice in 22v2 that occupying a central place in the city of God is the Tree of Life.  And it will always be in season, bearing fruit every month.  Firstly note it is the Tree of LIFE not of duty, of necessity, or of drudgery. It is the Tree of LIFE!  In the New Creation there will an unlimited access to life – full and free.

Secondly note that there is an abundance of fruit from the tree of life.  The new creation is a place of abundance and of provision.  In a world of scarcity, of fighting for survival, of starving children and economic oppression this is good news! One day there will be a world where there will be an abundance.  Where children will not go hungry, where you will not look the other way at the traffic lights, a world where there will be no more sweat shops or workaholics or the dehumanizing drudgery of factory workers, working long hours for minimum wage.

The New Creation will be a place of wealth and provision, of beauty, freedom and joy. It will be a place of life and of wonder.

Great Stories Have Great Endings 4

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This is part 4 of our series in Revelation 21-22.  You may also like to read parts one, two or three.

4) It is a Place of Rest:

When you read these chapters there is a real sense of safety and security.  It is a picture of a world at peace and at rest.  In the first creation account, the goal of creation was rest. Not a sleeping type of rest, per se, but a rich, beautiful enjoyment of God’s creation. At the end of the story we see the rest which was lost restored.  We are set free to once again enjoy and marvel in the beauty and splendour of the Creator and of his creation.

In 21v1 John notes that there is no longer any sea.  Firstly, before all the surfers faint, remember this is all picture language.  These images are not meant (in large) to show us what the new creation will look like.  The intention of the picture language is to show us what the new creation will BE like.

So in this instance, for the people, of the ancient world the sea commonly represent a place of fear, of uncertainty and of chaos.  In the new creation it is not necessarily the sea that will be absent but fear, uncertainty and chaos certainly will be absent.  It will be a world of peace, of safety, of rest and of order.  It will be a return to the character of Eden.

Central to these chapters are the image of the New Jerusalem, the city of God, the bride of Christ as a massive secure city with giant walls and huge gates (21 v 15-21).  The imagery itself is beautiful but when we remember that this was written in a day where invading armies, vengeance killings and marauding bandits were still very much a reality, then the idea of this huge, impenetrable city was a beautiful, comforting image.  The new creation will be a place of safety and refuge, no longer will there be any danger of invasion, of plunder, of slavery, of rape, of vengeance, or of wanton destruction.  No longer will there be a need to anxiously guard your property or your family, to hide from evil-doers or to fear the unknown.

But it gets better, the gates of this huge city will never be shut!  City gates were shut at night!  Night time, even in our days of electricity, is a time of danger, of fear and of uncertainty.  The gates of the New Jerusalem will never be shut because there will be no more night.  The new creation will not be a place of fear, of violence, of danger.

All these will be gone and those who practice those things will not be welcome in the city (21 v 27).  It is a beautiful and paradoxical picture of this imposing, massive city- impenetrable.  But yet its gates stand wide open…  As if to give a powerful visual aid to Jesus’ words “To all who are thirsty I will give freely from the springs of the water of life.” (21 v 6)

Photo Credit: Olivander

Great Stories Have Great Endings 3

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This is part 23of the series looking at Revelation 21-22

You may also want to read Part One and Part Two.

3) The New Creation is both physical and spiritual

There exists a massive assumption in Western Christianity that the purpose of being a Christian is simply to “go to heaven when you die.” That is, that we are in some sense, “souls in transit” waiting to be free of this earth.  This earth is at best an irrelevance, at worst a dark, gloomy, evil place.

This spiritual-physical dualism is simply not biblical.  The world God made and declared good was a physical world.  The fall was physical – eating fruit, realisation of nakedness, attempting to make clothes etc.  The story of redemption through the people of Israel is very much physical.  Jesus’ incarnation and his atoning death was physical.  His resurrection was physical.

God’s plan is not to rescue us from this prison of the physical. His plan was always that the spiritual and the physical would be two parts of a whole. Much like heaven and earth, which we see being finally joined together into one new creation in these chapters.  The sweep of the Bible story is not how God is doing away with this earth but how he is restoring all things to their original intention, which was both PHYSICAL and SPIRITUAL.

Most of this imagery found in this chapter is physical imagery – eating , drinking, a city, a river, a throne, the city coming down to earth, wiping away tears, a city that can be measured, the tree, roads, walls, gates. Even the things that are not there are physical – no sea, no darkness, no tears, no temple, no lamps.  It may be argued that most of these images must be understood in Old Testament picture language, with which I agree.  But still the pictures that are used are of the redeeming or perfection of physical images rather than some sort of escape from the physical.

NT Wright says“Heaven and earth… are not after all poles apart, needing to be separated for ever… No, they are different radically different; but they are made for each other in the same way as male and female. And when they finally come together, it will be cause for rejoicing in the same way that a wedding is a creational sign that God’s project is going forwards; that opposite poles within creation are made for union; not competition…”

Photo Credit: Olivander