Tag Archives: Missiology

The Geography of Power and Privilege

First pile of books plundered from library

First pile of books plundered from library

This is the year I have finally started my Masters in Missiology (the study of missions or the study of “what the heck are we meant to be doing and how should we do it” as I prefer) through the University of Stellenbosch. I have harboured a deep desire to study further for many years but due to time, finances and circumstances this has never been an option. Until now… so due to a happy confluence of circumstances (Sovereignty if you will) I am able to dedicate a significant portion of my time to academic study of the next two years.

Although these things are notoriously fickle at the hands of supervisors and further reading here is my first attempt at articulating the area I hope to look at in my research.

“The effects of the apartheid system continue to affect the mission and the life of the church in Cape Town. In particular the long-term structures around which our city was re-engineered through the group areas act continues to entrench the division of races and economics in our city. The flow of power and of privilege very much follows the geographical contours of inequality in our city. The church has had a chequered history with these divisions at times supporting it, at times opposing it but mostly a quiet acquiescence through the development of a parallel structure of power and geography that mirrored, upheld or even enhanced the division of race and power. The post 1994 changes have mostly not brought about any significant changes in the geography of privilege and power. The evangelical church, by nature conservative lags behind entrenching often unwittingly the now traditional structures of power that so divide our city. What can the church do? Or perhaps more significantly what will the church do? Will we meekly wait for the city and the world to slowly and grudgingly change (if indeed we can even truly see our city redeemed) or will we act in spite of what we see, will we become a people of hope, willing ourselves to run counter cultural to the well established lines of privilege and prestige in our city. How can the church be a movement of hope in overcoming the geography of power that shapes and moulds our city still today?”

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Great Stories Have Great Endings 1

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Great stories have great endings. In fact I think it is the ending that defines the story…

In the urban spirituality of the city there is a somewhat accepted spiritual epithet that “it is not the destination that matters but the journey.”  This sounds really spiritual but in reality it is, quite simply, a load of cobblers (always wanted to write that, it just sounds so Dickensian).  The ending is that which gives shape and substance to the entire the story.

If the ending is tragic then the story is a tragedy, despite the moments of joy and laughter that may be found in the journey.  If the ending is happy then the story is a comedy (as defined by Buechner) despite the moments of sadness and tears which it may take to bring the story to the required happy ending.  The ending is not simply that which ends the story, it is that which gives shape, substance and even meaning to the entire story.

This is equally true for the Bible story as for any other story.

The biblical ending defines, shapes and gives meaning and significance to the biblical story. If the ending is rubbish or trite then the story is a waste of time. Certainly not something to base your life on.

To use some big words for a minute our ESCHATOLOGY defines our MISSIOLOGY which defines our ECCLESIOLOGY (HT to Alan Hirsch whom I ripped off slightly).  To translate our doctrine of the end must defines our mission which must shape our doctrine of church.

I have been reading, teaching and meditating recently on the end of the Bible story (Revelation 21-22).  A few things stood out for me:

1) God does it

This chapter is full of God’s work.  This glorious picture of the new heavens and the new earth- it is all God’s doing.  Only He can do. Only He will do it.  And as a result all the glory can only go to Him (21:2-5).

And the Lamb is at the centre of all that he does (21:9, 22, 23, 27; 22:1, 3).  Who is this Lamb? It is the the Lamb who was slain (5:6, 9).  At the centre of the New Creation is Jesus who died, for our sins (the Lamb who was slain).  The New Creation will forever be shaped by the king who died for his people.

What particularly struck me is that in Revelation 19 we have just had this picture of Jesus on the white horse, with eyes like blazing fire. A sword coming out of his mouth, He is crowned with many crowns, and the name King of Kings is written on his robe and on his thigh.   He comes to judge the nations and to rule them an iron sceptre.  It is a great and terrifying picture of a powerful and mighty king come in judgement

I think I have always assumed that it is this King who will be the centre of our worship in the new creation.  But when we come to Revelation 21-22 who is at the centre of the new creation, the Lamb who was slain!  Without reading too much into the picture language of Revelation, it is the pattern of the Lamb which is will shape the pattern of life in the new creation.

photo credit:  Olivander